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Tuesday, 04 October 2022 00:00

A fracture is when a bone breaks or cracks. When it comes to the ankle, three different bones can be fractured: the tibia (the larger of the two bones in the lower leg), the fibula (the thinner of the two bones in the lower leg), and the talus (the wedge-shaped bone deep inside the ankle). The most common way an ankle can break involves a sharp twist of the ankle or a direct impact to the ankle, causing a fracture to one of the ankle bones. Athletes are at a high risk for ankle fractures. Such a fracture can be particularly dangerous if a bone pokes through the skin and is exposed to the air as the open wound allows bacteria to affect the broken bone and increases risk of infection. Symptoms of a broken ankle include pain, swelling, and bruising of the ankle joint. There will often be an inability to move the ankle normally and to bear weight on it. If you think you have fractured your ankle, see a podiatrist as soon as possible for a proper evaluation and treatment.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Chukwuma Ukata, DPM from Advanced Carolina Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Garner, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Tuesday, 27 September 2022 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot affliction and source of heel pain. The condition is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia, which is a band of tissue running along the arch of the foot. There are many ways that a podiatrist might recommend treating plantar fasciitis. For example, more conservative treatment options might include performing stretches/exercises, wearing a foot splint, wearing arch supports, or taking anti-inflammatory drugs. In other cases, effective treatment options might include shock wave therapy, which utilizes sound waves to stimulate the plantar fascia. A cortisone injection might even be attempted once to address cases of plantar fasciitis. In more severe cases, a surgical procedure might help treat a case of plantar fasciitis. If you have this foot condition, contact a podiatrist today.


 

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Chukwuma Ukata, DPM  from Advanced Carolina Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Garner, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 20 September 2022 00:00

A bunion is a foot deformity that manifests itself as a bony bump near the joint of the big toe. Importantly, bunions might also form at the base of the pinky toe as well, which are known as bunionettes. If you have a bunion, you may experience any number of symptoms, including swelling at the affected joint, redness, and possibly pain. If you have a severe case of bunions that does not respond to other forms of treatment, undergoing a surgical procedure to treat your bunions may possibly be an option. Such a procedure typically requires up to six months of recovery time, and it is primarily concerned with reducing pain and bringing the metatarsophalangeal joint back into alignment. The different types of relevant surgical procedures are known as an osteotomy, arthrodesis, and exostectomy, among others. If you have bunions and think you may be a candidate for bunion surgery, contact a podiatrist today. 

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Chukwuma Ukata, DPM of Advanced Carolina Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Garner, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Monday, 19 September 2022 00:00

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

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